Miraflores: Lost But Not Forgotten

Miraflores: Lost But Not Forgotten

People, lots of people, care about Miraflores.  "Miraflores: Doctor Urrutia's Lost Garden" garnered much attention on the Rivard Report and on social media. Thanks to everyone who read, commented and emailed.

Some who remember Miraflores are current and former students of the University of Incarnate Word, who have been wondering for years what Miraflores held behind its mysterious gates. Some are old San Antonians, who remember very well Miraflores as it used to be, even as far back as the 1950s when it was already beginning to weather.  Rebeca Barrera remembers that she knew about Miraflores first through photographs in a booklet that Dr. Urrutia made. James Sutton remembers the impact of the Nike of Samothrace replica on his imagination as his family drove past the property. Fortunately the sculpture, pictured above, still resides at Miraflores--one of the few remaining intact objects.  Others even recall the Clinica Urrutia offices, with its beautiful waiting room, and the kind and gentle manner of the Doctor himself.

Readers describe Miraflores as magical, mysterious, fascinating, monumental; a historical, cultural treasure worthy of preservation.  As Nan Cuba commented: β€œIt's time to restore this historical treasure.”

The garden may be lost to time, but it is far from forgotten.  And that bodes well for
its future.  

I would love to hear more from people who knew Dr. Urrutia, who died in 1975 at age 103. Maybe you or a relative were treated by him or one of his sons in his clinic, or visited Farmacia Urrutia.  Perhaps you had occasion to visit the house, or have a memory of Miraflores.  Please write to me at elise@quintaurrutia.com and tell me what you remember.

Local Heroes

Local Heroes

Doctor Urrutia's Lost Garden

Doctor Urrutia's Lost Garden